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Tableau Basics: An Article on Aggregate Functions in Calculated Fields

Tableau Basics: An Article on Aggregate Functions in Calculated Fields

Want to be an expert in Tableau? Then you must start with the basics and learn them well. And to help you in your endeavors, we have created a blog series covering the fundamentals of Tableau. These articles are easy-to-follow and shall help you understand how and when to use the Calculated Field functions.

In this blog, we discuss Aggregate Functions. In Aggregate Functions, we group together multiple rows of values to form a single input value that is more meaningful, like a set or list. In order to access these functions select the option ‘Aggregate’ from the drop down list for functions in the ‘Create Calculated Filed’ window.

Now, let’s discuss the different types of Aggregate Functions one by one ad look into a few examples. A person having some experience in Excel will find these functions familiar.

 

ATTR Function
ATTR(expression)

 

The ATTR function, short form for attribute, gives back a value when all rows have a single value. In case the values in the rows are different, the value ‘’*” is returned. It ignores null values. Example:

AVG Function
AVG(expression)

 

The AVG function returns a value that is the average of all the values in a given expression. It is used only for numeric fields. Null values are not considered. Example:

COUNT Function
COUNT(expression)

 

COUNT function returns the number of items present in a particular group. Null values are ignored. Example:

COUNTD Function
COUNTD(expression)

 

COUNTD function returns distinct items in a group and counts them only once. Null values are ignored.

The function isn’t offered in certain types of workbooks, like the ones that were created prior to Tableau Desktop v8.2, workbooks where MS Excel or text files are used as sources of data, etc. Example:

MAX Function
MAX(expression)

 

A MAX function is used to obtain the maximum of two expressions for each record or the maximum of a single expression across all records. The two expressions must have the same type of argument. If either of the arguments is NULL, then NULL value is returned. Example:

MEDIAN Function
MEDIAN(expression)

 

The median is the middle value of a sequence and the MEDIAN function is used to obtain the median for one particular expression. It only works for fields that are numeric. In case null values are present, they are ignored. Example:

MIN Function
MIN(expression)

 

The functionality of this function is similar to the MAX function. It is used to return the minimum of a single expression across all records or the minimum between two expressions for each record. If either of the two values is NULL, then a NULL value is returned. Like before, both the expressions need to have the same type of argument. Example:

PERCENTILE Function
PERCENTILE(expression, number)

 

A number between O and 1 is given and PERCENTILE function returns the percentile expression corresponding to that number. If 0.50 is given, then it returns the median number. Example:

STDEV Function
STDEV(expression)

 

This is actually a statistical function and stands for standard deviation. STDEV function is used to obtain the statistical standard deviation for all values for a specific expression pertaining to the sample of a population.

 

STDEVP Function
STDEVP(expression)

 

The STDEVP function is similar to the STDEV function above, but it returns the statistical standard deviation for all the values in an expression that pertains to a biased population.

 

SUM Function
SUM(expression)

 

Simply put, this function adds up all the values in an expression. Example:

VAR Function
VAR(expression)

 

VAR is another statistical function that returns the statistical variance for all the values in an expression pertaining to a sample of the population.

 

VARP Function
VARP(expression)

 

Similar to the function above, VARP function returns the statistical variance for all the values of an expression that pertains to the entire population.

Calculated Fields:

Calculated fields enable users to create more robust visualizations in Tableau. If you have missed our earlier blogs on Calculated Field functions, then visit the blog section of DexLab Analytics-we provide one of the best Tableau certifications in Delhi.

In order to be a Tableau expert, you need to enroll for comprehensive and well-structured Tableau BI training courses.

 

This article has been sourced from: www.interworks.com/blog/ccapitula/2015/05/07/tableau-essentials-calculated-fields-aggregate-functions

 

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Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide: Calculated Field- Type Conversion Functions

Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide: Calculated Field- Type Conversion Functions

In this blog, we introduce Type Conversion Functions. In the earlier blogs of the Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide blog series, we have covered Logical Functions, Number Functions and Date Functions. These blogs are easy-to-read and particularly helpful for Tableau rookies who want to develop a foundational knowledge about the Calculated Field fundamentals. These step-by-step guides are perfect for Tableau enthusiasts who want to understand how and when to use the various functions available in Tableau’s calculated fields.

Today, we will explain Type Conversion Functions. This group of functions enables users to change the data type of fields. You can convert the result of an expression to another data type. For example, using the Type Conversion functions, you can convert numbers, like age values, to strings. These functions are useful when the underlying data source needs some groundwork to harness the full potential of your visualization.

These functions are uncomplicated and easy to understand. So, let’s dive right in!

  • DATE Function

DATE(expression)

The date function is used to convert a number, string or date expression to a date. Example:

  • DATETIME Function

DATETIME(expression)

Datetime function takes the functionality of the Date function mentioned above a step further as it can be used to return a time component. This function is used to get back a datetime from a date, number or string expression. Example:

  • FLOAT Function

FLOAT(expression)

The Float function is used to return its argument as a floating point number. Example:

  • INT Function

INT(expression)

The INT function is used to convert its argument into an integer. This function truncates result of an expression to the integer closest to zero. Example:

  • STR Function

STR(expression)

The STR function is used to convert its argument into string data type. Example:

With the help of these functions, you can convert the result of arguments to different data types. For instance, if you want to make certain that all the values within date fields are date or datetime data types, then Date function and Datetime function comes very handy.

Want to learn about all the amazing features available in Tableau? Follow DexLab Analytics– we are among the leading institutes providing Tableau certification in Delhi. To know more about our Tableau BI training courses, visit our website. Check back for previous blogs where we have covered some essential Calculated Field functions.

 

This article has been sourced from: https://interworks.com/blog/ccapitula/2015/04/30/tableau-essentials-calculated-fields-type-conversion

 

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Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide: Calculated Field-Date Functions

Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide: Calculated Field-Date Functions

Calculated fields in Tableau are new fields created by a user that are saved in the data store and can be applied for constructing more robust visualizations.

Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide is a blog series covering the fundamentals of Tableau Software to help you develop a foundational knowledge of the Calculated Field functions. So, if you are a newbie planning to get started with Tableau or if you simply want to explore the popular features in Tableau, then these step-by-step guides are perfect for you.

In this bog, we shall discuss about the Date Functions that you can use after creating a calculated field. In the previous two articles of this blog series, we explored Logical Functions and Number Functions. Now, let’s begin our exploration of Date Functions.

  • To open the Calculated Field window, right-click anywhere over the Date window (sidebar) and the menu appears on the screen.

  • Select the option ‘’Create Calculated Field”. This brings up the Calculated Field window. If you right-click on a specific dimension or measure to create a calculation, then the formula text region of the Calculated Field displays it.

  • Next, select the option ‘’Date’’ from the drop-down menu under ‘’Functions’’. This filters the functions to display only a list of Date Functions.

  • The date_part, which is applied in a number of Date Functions, can take the following values:
  • Second (0-60)
  • Minute (0-59)
  • Hour (0-23)
  • Day (1-31)
  • Weekday (1-7 or use their names, i.e. ‘’Monday’’, etc.)
  • Week (1-52)
  • DayofYear (1-365)
  • Month (1-12 or use their names, i.e. ‘’December’’, etc.)
  • Quarter (1-4)
  • Year (four-digit representation)

Next, let’s examine the Date Functions one by one:

  • DATEADD Function

DATEADD(date_part, interval, date)

The DATEADD function enables a user to specify a part of a date and then increment it. This function alters the date by incrementing the date_part by the number mentioned in the interval. Example:

  • DATEDIFF Function

DATEIFF(date_part, date1, date 2, start_of_week)

This function returns the difference between date1 and date2, expressed in units decided by date_part. The parameter start_of_week is optional, and if it is undefined, then the associated data source determines the start of the week.

  • DATENAME Function

DATENAME(date_part, date, [start_of_week])

Using this function, the date_part parameter of the date is returned as a string. Here also, the start_of_week parameter isn’t compulsory. Example:

  • DATEPARSE Function

DATEPARSE(format, string)

This function works exactly in the opposite manner of DATENAME function. It converts a string into a date or time following the format specified by the user. In case the string and specified format don’t match, then a Null value is returned. Example:

  • DATEPART

DATEPART(date_part, date, start_of_week)

This function returns the date_part parameter of the date as an integer. Again, the start_of_week parameter isn’t compulsory. Example:

When the date_part parameter is set as weekday, start_of_date parameter is excluded, as in this case Tableau uses a specific order to apply offsets.

  • DATETRUNC

DATERUNC(date_part, date, start_of_week)

This function is used to round off the date to the accuracy specified in the date_part of the function. Example:

The start_of_week is optional, and if excluded, then the data source determines it.

  • DAY

DAY(date)

This function is used to return the day of a specific date as an integer. Example:

  • ISDATE

ISDATE(string)

This function runs a logical test and is also incorporated within the list of Logical Functions. It tests a string and indicates if a specified data is valid (true) or not (false). Example:

  • MAX Function

MAX(expression) or MAX(expr1, expr2)

The MAX function is included in other categories of functions too. This function is used to return the maximum of a singular expression across all records or the maximum between two expressions for each record. Both the arguments need to be of the same type. In case one of the arguments is NULL, it returns a NULL value. Example:

  • MIN Function

MIN(expression) or MIN(expr1, expr2)

Similar to the MAX function, MIN function is popularly used as a Number Function, but is also used as a Date Function. This function is used to return the minimum of a singular expression across all records or the minimum between two expressions for each record. Both the arguments need to be of the same type. In case one of the arguments is NULL, it returns a NULL value. Example:

  • MONTH

MONTH(date)

This function is used to return the month of a particular date as an integer. Example:

  • NOW

NOW()

This function is used to get the current date and time. Example:

  • TODAY

TODAY()

This function is used to get the current date. Example:

  • YEAR

YEAR(date)

This function is used to return the year of a particular date as an integer. Example:

Want to learn more about Tableau? Follow DexLab Analytics, one of the leading Tableau training institutes in Delhi, to read more blogs covering all the fantastic features in Tableau. Check back for articles covering Logical Functions and Number Functions. If you are looking for Tableau certification courses in Delhi, check DexLab’s online and classroom tableau training courses.

 

This article has been sourced from: https://interworks.com/blog/ccapitula/2015/04/15/tableau-essentials-calculated-fields-date-functions

 

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Easy-to-Read Tableau Reference Guide on Calculated Fields – Number Functions

Easy-to-Read Tableau Reference Guide on Calculated Fields

It’s not possible for everyone to ace in Tableau, at least not yet. Tableau is a versatile data visualization application that facilitates users to examine structured data virtually, while displaying information in several interactive graphic perspectives. Though it’s very easy to use and a lot of individuals use Tableau Desktop for creating data visualizations, it churns out best results when employed by expert hands.

Thus, to help Tableau stalwarts, we’re here with a set of blogs on Tableau Essentials that will help you dig into the basics of using this powerful data visualization software, especially Desktop versions 8.1 and 8.2. This blog is a continuation of the Tableau blog on Logical Functions. It was part I and this one, which exclusively sheds light on Number Functions is part II. Here, we will deeply focus on another group of functions implemented for Tableau’s calculated fields. Scroll below to get started…

First, open the Calculated Fields window, right-click on the sidebar (Data window) and choose Create Calculated Field:

TECFNumber1_0-01

Now, in the Calculated Field Window, choose Number from the Functions drop-down menu:

TECFNumber5-02

LN FUNCTION

LN(number)

It returns the natural log of the number. Now, if the numbers appear to be less than or equal to zero, the function tends to return NULL.

For an example,

TECFNumber6-03

LOG FUNCTION

LOG(number,[base])

LOG brings back the log of the number for a given base. In case, there’s no base, the function will use base 10 by default.

For an example,

TECFNumber7-04

PI FUNCTION

PI()

It helps return the numeric constant of PI.

TECFNumber8-05

POWER FUNCTION

POWER(number, function)

This function increases the number to the defined power.

For an example,

TECFNumber9

RADIANS FUNCTION

RADIAN(number)

This is a superb function to convert numbers from degrees to radians.

TECFNumber10

ROUND FUNCTION

ROUND(number,[decimals])

Use this function to round off any number to the nearest integer or to a particular number of decimal places.

For an instance,

TECFNumber11

SIGN FUNCTION

SIGN(number)

This function brings back the sign of a number.

In case of positive numbers, it returns a 1.

For zero, it returns a 0.

For negative numbers, the function returns a -1.

For an example,

TECFNumber12

SQRT FUNCTION

SQRT(number)

It returns the square root of a number.

TECFNumber13

SQUARE FUNCTION

SQUARE(number)

This function returns the square of the number.

For an instance,

TECFNumber14

ZN FUNCTION

ZN(expression)

The specialty of ZN function is that it evaluates any expression.

If the function is NULL, it will return a value of 0, and if not, the expression is returned as before.

For example,

TECFNumber15

STATISTICAL

MAX FUNCTION

MAX(number, number)

This function returns the maximal of two expressions for each record or an expression throughout all records. However, the two statements have to be the same type. If one or the other argument turns NULL, the function returns a value of NULL.

TECFNumber16

MIN FUNCTION

MIN(number, number)

Just like MAX function, MIN function too returns the minimal of an expression across the records or minimal of two expressions for a particular record. The two arguments must be similar in type. Also, if one or the other arguments hold NULL, MIN returns a value NULL.

TECFNumber17

TRIGONOMETRIC

ACOS FUNCTION

ACOS(number)

ACOS function returns the arc cosine of the number and the outcome is in radians.

Take a look,

TECFNumber18

ASIN FUNCTION

ASIN(number)

This function returns the arc sine of the number. And as usual the outcome is in radians.

TECFNumber19

ATAN FUNCTION

ATAN(number)

It returns the arc tangent of any number, and as usual the outcomes is in radians.

TECFNumber20

ATAN2 FUNCTION

ATAN2(y number, x number)

It’s quite similar to the previous ATAN FUNCTION, except it’s used for two given numbers. Otherwise, all remains same.

TECFNumber21

COS FUNCTION

COS(number)

Cos returns the cosine of an angle. Just mention the angle in radians.

For example,

TECFNumber22

COT FUNCTION

COT(number)

COT FUNCTION returns the cotangent of an angle. Marking of angles in radians is important.

TECFNumber23

SIN FUNCTION

SIN(number)

This function returns the sine of an angle. For example,

TECFNumber24

TAN FUNCTION

TAN(number)

 TAN FUNCTION returns the tangent of an angle. You just need to mention the angle in radians and that’s it.

TECFNumber25

Typically, it all depends on the nature of your business; if it needs, you have to go through Number Functions routinely, otherwise not. Now, if you really have to use them then peruse over Tableau course details at DexLab Analytics. Being a premier Tableau training institute in Gurgaon, DexLab will offer a whole new layer of insight into Tableau Essentials.

 

The article has been sourced from – https://interworks.com/blog/ccapitula/2015/04/07/tableau-essentials-calculated-fields-number-functions

 

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Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide: Calculated Fields-Logical Functions

Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide: Calculated Fields-Logical Functions
Comprehensive Tableau Reference Guide is a blog series for explaining the basics of Tableau Software. So, if you are a newbie planning to get started with Tableau or if you simply want to explore the popular features in Tableau, then these step-by-step guides are perfect for you. In this blog, we will discuss about Logical Functions in Tableau.

  • Go to the Calculated Field window:

1

  • Go to Functions table. From the drop-down menu, select the option ‘’Logical’’:

2

  • This selection filters the list of functions to display a listing of only logical functions, which consists of seven different functions:

3

We will explain these functions one by one.

  • CASE Function:

CASE expression WHEN value1 THEN return1 WHEN value2 THEN return2… ELSE default return END

The CASE function is applied when we need to perform a logical test. This function returns values based on the result of the logical test. A CASE function can also be written as an IF function. Generally, CASE function statements are simpler and shorter.

Example of a formula using CASE function:

004

Going through the country field, when the function comes across the value ‘’United States’’, it uses ‘’USA’’. On the other hand, when it comes across “United Kingdom’’, the function uses ‘’UK”. For all other values in the country field, ‘’World’’ is used.

  • IF Function:

IF test THEN value END/IF test THEN value ELSE else END

A logical test can be created using the IF function. The function works like this- IF the test is true THEN carry out the given condition. The test portion of the function must be Boolean. This can be achieved either by selecting a Boolean field from data source or by constructing the expression using operators and logical comparisons (AND, OR, NOT).

Example:

Logical205

IF test1 THEN value1 ELSEIF test2 THEN value2 ELSE else END

This statement is used when the functionality of IF function needs to be expanded. Additional IF-THEN statements can be incorporated through ELSEIF. Here’s an example to rewrite the CASE formula above with IF-THEN-ELSEIF statement:

Logical3-03

The result is the same as before.

  • IFNULL Function:

IFNULL(expression1, expression2)

The IFNULL function is used to perform a true/false test and check if the value in the tested field is NULL or not. If the value isn’t null then the first value of the function is used, and if the value is null then the second one is used.

Logical4_05

If Total Population of a country has no value, then it will be reset as zero and the null shall be eliminated from the newly created field.

  • IIF Function:

IIF(test, then, else, [unknown])

IIF function is very much alike the IF function described above, just a shorthand version for the IF-THEN-ELSE statement. The final argument of IIF function can define a value in case the test produces an unknown result. Like the IF function, the test must be Boolean, either by data type or the result of the test must give a Boolean value.

Here’s an example:

Logical5-06

If the % of change field is lower than 5% then the value Poor will be returned, or else the value Good will be returned.

  • ISDATE Function:

ISDATE(string)

The ISDATE function is used to determine if a string argument can be converted to a valid date (TRUE) or not (FALSE).

Example:

Logical6_1

This formula is supported by Tableau since the field used is a string data type, however each result will be FALSE. This function comes handy in case dates are formatted in a manner that is unrecognizable by a user, like ISO 8601.

Example:

Logical7_2

The above value stands for September 1, 2014 and is obviously a valid date.

  • ISNULL Function:

ISNULL(expression)

This is a simple function that checks if an expression is null (TRUE) or not (FALSE).

Example:

Logical8-03

The Filter card enables users to filter null values from their visualization.

  • ZN Function:

Statement: ZN(expression)

The ZN function is a variant of the ISNULL and IFNULL functions. It tests whether a function is null or not. In case the function is null, it returns a zero value.

Example:

Logical9_04

It is natural to feel overwhelmed when you see a list of logical functions for the first time. Since we have discussed each one of them, hopefully these functions will come handy in your visualization and data leveraging pursuits.

To learn more about Tableau functions, follow Dexlab Analytics– it is one of the best Tableau training institutes in Delhi. Do take a look at their Tableau BI training courses.

 

This article has been sourced from:  https://interworks.com/blog/ccapitula/2015/04/01/tableau-essentials-calculated-fields-logical-functions

 

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Top 3 Tableau Apps to Make the Most Out of Business Intelligence Software

Top 3 Tableau Apps to Make the Most Out of Business Intelligence Software

Dashboard visualization is big data’s next in-trend topic. Well-presented information boosts our processing capabilities. Programs like Tableau aim to do exactly that. Tableau uses state-of – art and highly functional graphics to transform big data into something pleasant to look at. More importantly, it has the profound ability to source data from cloud as well as hard drive units of various shapes and sizes, while simultaneously cross-paneling the information into meaningful graphs, charts and tables. This in turn have a remarkable impact on the overall speed to market time through the conversion of input information into interactive, actionable choices. As a result it speeds up the process of realizing the business decisions.

Today, there exists an intense competition between enterprise editions of Tableau. Many of these upon realizing the market value of the incredible visuals which are unique to Tableau have chosen build on it. This has been achieved through the addition of some useful functions and features. Following are the top 3 apps among these enterprise editions of Tableau.

  1. Alteryx

Alteryx fuels Tableau visualizations with an advanced level of data blending, transposing and analysis. As a result it is more efficient in presenting the data. It makes use of automated progresses thereby reducing the need to perform manual actions. Alteryx has been impressive in its exploration of spatial, predictive and statistical analysis, ease of transposability using drag/drop facility, and also because coding is not a requirement. It is capable of handling big data or cloud data in sequence with local or hard drive data. Collaborative information becomes scalable and more manageable.

  1. BI Connector

BI Connector is a self-serving data performer which seamlessly bridges the functions of Tableau and OBIEE without demanding the knowledge of an IT expert. Strong security protocol from OBIEE is utilized to safeguard data while it’s being exported, such as publishing worksheets with the drag/drop facility. The dashboard interface makes collaborating data more flexible. Also, the fluidity of its navigation is user-friendly and practical. Services on a server and desktop are equally powerful.

  1. Dataiku

Dataiku boosts the ability of its users to ‘think’ data. Its performance and credibility are honed through additional visual interfaces. In particular, Dataiku DSS lays emphasis on a capability pertaining to trending and predictive data. The users can even chose to share out code snippets or create their own model. This program exclusively caters to big data infrastructures. Dataiku permits users to quickly comprehend complex feature interactions and analyze coefficients. The best part about all these processes is their navigation which uses a rather visually-pleasing interface.

Hence Tableau enables users to interrelate with data and then proceed with its visualization which includes the creation of interactive and sharable dashboards. It enables the world’s largest organizations unleash the power of their most valuable asset- data. To know more about Data Visualization take a look at the Tableau BI Certification course conducted by DexLab Analytics-a premier institute offering professional courses on data science.

References:

https://www.biconnector.com/blog/3-apps-to-get-the-most-out-of-tableau/

http://www.dashboardinsight.com/articles/digital-dashboards/fundamentals/what-is-a-dashboard.aspx

 

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It’s Time to Upgrade Tableau with Hyper

On 10th January, 2018 Tableau 10.5 was launched!

 
It’s Time to Upgrade Tableau with Hyper
 

Once you upgrade yourself to Tableau’s latest version, you will automatically get access to Hyper, Tableau’s new, licensed data engine technology. Hyper harbors the cutting edge technology to deliver up to 3x enhanced extract creation speed and up to 5x improved query performance.

Continue reading “It’s Time to Upgrade Tableau with Hyper”

Here’s the Most Creative Ways to Embed Google Trends Data in Tableau Dashboard

Tableau and Google Trends? Wow, what a smashing combination to tick all the right boxes!!

Here’s the Most Creative Ways to Embed Google Trends Data in Tableau Dashboard

Also, you would be more than happy to know how some sections in your data have gotten along in search over time as compared to the others. Undeniably.

Continue reading “Here’s the Most Creative Ways to Embed Google Trends Data in Tableau Dashboard”

Top 4 Tableau Things That Changed the Way I Visualize Data

Top 4 Tableau Things That Changed the Way I Visualize Data

I love Tableau. I found it to be amazing and the best way to visualize data and develop fabulous reports and analysis. 4 years and still counting, I have come across various advanced features and concepts regarding Tableau, which actually enhanced the way I see Tableau as a fantastic tool for data representation. If I could go back in time and preach 4 Tableau concepts, this is what I would have liked to cover:

The fight between Green & Blue

Tableau differentiates. The differentiation is subject to the types of fields used in a view. Green data fields are continuous, while the blue ones are separate. The green ones give out gradient colors, axes and range filters, whereas the blues result in headers, multi-select filters and categorical colors.

Data Science Machine Learning Certification

The Importance of INDEX function (and its close associates)

Though I have scavenged through every available functions of Tableau in order to become a Tableau maestro in my early days, I knew I hadn’t made proper use of the functions INDEX, FIRST and LAST, until now. The main purpose of INDEX is to create a rank, irrespective of any order in which your items need to be displayed on the screen or by any other measure. It is thoroughly flexible and gives you enough room to sort, screen and put up your data in ways not possible otherwise.

While you drag and drop, Tableau writes a query language

Tableau is an intelligent visualization tool. It incorporates all kinds of latest, breakthrough technologies that assists in creating complicated visuals out of languorous data sets with just a simple drag and drop interface. However, on closer look, you will find that Tableau makes use of the data using a form of SQL and then gives shape to your data on screen with an ‘interpreter’.

Just incorporate a measure on label, a dimension on rows and write a query on the line of

SELECT Region, Sum(Sales) FROM Orders GROUP BY Region

You can also put another dimension straight on the filter shelf and it will come with a WHERE clause. After some classification, you get an ORDER BY.

Order of operations

Tableau always performs in an orderly manner – things are done here in a certain manner, and this order eventually helps you in creating a perfect view that will fetch you the desired results. Whether you add fields to your view or filter shelf or do custom calculations, all the items are calculated simultaneously.



Things are treated in the following order:

Context filters will generate a temp table in the source
Top N and/or conditional filters make a part of the SELECT command in the query
Standard filters are used as a WHERE clause
Aggregations are ciphered
Table calculations are implemented
Table layout and axes are etched
Anything on the Pages shelf is held accountable
Marks are then sketched

eca1faa965cdeeaff14af77b9f1e4635---years-i-wish

So, this is it! I figured out these functions, which helped me to derive the best out of Tableau. If you too had a Eureka moment, then feel free to let us know.

Of course, you might not be familiar with databases and SQL yet you can still become a Tableau expert without nailing the basics, but if you possess a bit of data analysis knowledge then our Tableau training courses Gurgaon can help accelerate your knowledge further. For more, check Tableau BI training courses by DexLab Analytics Delhi.

 

This article was sourced from – www.theinformationlab.co.uk/2013/01/28/5-things-i-wish-i-knew-about-tableau-when-i-started

 

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