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MongoDB Basics Part-II

In our previous blog we discussed about few of the basic functions of MQL like .find() , .count() , .pretty() etc. and in this blog we will continue to do the same. At the end of the blog there is a quiz for you to solve, feel free to test your knowledge and wisdom you have gained so far.

Given below is the list of functions that can be used for data wrangling:-

  1. updateOne() :- This function is used to change the current value of a field in a single document.

After changing the database to “sample_geospatial” we want to see what the document looks like? So for that we will use .findOne() function.

Now lets update the field value of “recrd” from ‘ ’ to “abc” where the “feature_type” is ‘Wrecks-Visible’.

Now within the .updateOne() funtion any thing in the first part of { } is the condition on the basis of which we want to update the given document and the second part is the changes which we want to make. Here we are saying that set the value as “abc” in the “recrd” field . In case you wanted to increase the value by a certain number ( assuming that the value is integer or float) you can use “$inc” instead.

2. updateMany() :- This function updates many documents at once based on the condition provided.

3. deleteOne() & deleteMany() :- These functions are used to delete one or many documents based on the given condition or field.

4. Logical Operators :-

“$and” : It is used to match all the conditions.

“$or” : It is used to match any of the conditions.

The first code matches both the conditions i.e. name should be “Wetpaint” and “category_code” should be “web”, whereas the second code matches any one of the conditions i.e. either name should be “Wetpaint” or “Facebook”. Try these codes and see the difference by yourself.

 

So, with that we come to the end of the discussion on the MongoDB Basics. Hopefully it helped you understand the topic, for more information you can also watch the video tutorial attached down this blog. The blog is designed and prepared by Niharika Rai, Analytics Consultant, DexLab Analytics DexLab Analytics offers machine learning courses in Gurgaon. To keep on learning more, follow DexLab Analytics blog.


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Introduction to MongoDB

MongoDB is a document based database program which was developed by MongoDB Inc. and is licensed under server side public license (SSPL). It can be used across platforms and is a non-relational database also known as NoSQL, where NoSQL means that the data is not stored in the conventional tabular format and is used for unstructured data as compared to SQL and that is the major difference between NoSQL and SQL.
MongoDB stores document in JSON or BSON format. JSON also known as JavaScript Object notation is a format where data is stored in a key value pair or array format which is readable for a normal human being whereas BSON is nothing but the JSON file encoded in the binary format which is quite hard for a human being to understand.
Structure of MongoDB which uses a query language MQL(Mongodb query language):-
Databases:- Databases is a group of collections.
Collections:- Collection is a group fields.
Fields:- Fields are nothing but key value pairs
Just for an example look at the image given below:-

Here I am using MongoDB Compass a tool to connect to Atlas which is a cloud based platform which can help us write our queries and start performing all sort of data extraction and deployment techniques. You can download MongoDB Compass via the given link https://www.mongodb.com/try/download/compass

In the above image in the red box we have our databases and if we click on the “sample_training” database we will see a list of collections similar to the tables in sql.

Now lets write our first query and see what data in “companies” collection looks like but before that select the “companies” collection.

Now in our filter cell we can write the following query:-

In the above query “name” and “category_code” are the key values also known as fields and “Wetpaint” and “web” are the pair values on the basis of which we want to filter the data.
What is cluster and how to create it on Atlas?
MongoDB cluster also know as sharded cluster is created where each collection is divided into shards (small portions of the original data) which is a replica set of the original collection. In case you want to use Atlas there is an unpaid version available with approximately 512 mb space which is free to use. There is a pre-existing cluster in MongoDB named Sandbox , which currently I am using and you can use it too by following the given steps:-
1. Create a free account or sign in using your Google account on
https://www.mongodb.com/cloud/atlas/lp/try2-in?utm_source=google&utm_campaign=gs_apac_india_search_brand_atlas_desktop&utm_term=mongodb%20atlas&utm_medium=cpc_paid_search&utm_ad=e&utm_ad_campaign_id=6501677905&gclid=CjwKCAiAr6-ABhAfEiwADO4sfaMDS6YRyBKaciG97RoCgBimOEq9jU2E5N4Jc4ErkuJXYcVpPd47-xoCkL8QAvD_BwE
2. Click on “Create an Organization”.
3. Write the organization name “MDBU”.
4. Click on “Create Organization”.
5. Click on “New Project”.
6. Name your project M001 and click “Next”.
7. Click on “Build a Cluster”.
8. Click on “Create a Cluster” an option under which free is written.
9. Click on the region closest to you and at the bottom change the name of the cluster to “Sandbox”.
10. Now click on connect and click on “Allow access from anywhere”.
11. Create a Database User and then click on “Create Database User”.
username: m001-student
password: m001-mongodb-basics
12. Click on “Close” and now load your sample as given below :

Loading may take a while….
13. Click on collections once the sample is loaded and now you can start using the filter option in a similar way as in MongoDB Compass
In my next blog I’ll be sharing with you how to connect Atlas with MongoDB Compass and we will also learn few ways in which we can write query using MQL.

So, with that we come to the end of the discussion on the MongoDB. Hopefully it helped you understand the topic, for more information you can also watch the video tutorial attached down this blog. The blog is designed and prepared by Niharika Rai, Analytics Consultant, DexLab Analytics DexLab Analytics offers machine learning courses in Gurgaon. To keep on learning more, follow DexLab Analytics blog.


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MongoDB Basics Part-I

In this particular blog we will discuss about few of the basic functions of MQL (MongoDB Query Language) and we will also see how to use them? We will be using MongoDB Compass shell (MongoSH Beta) which is available in the latest version of MongoDB Compass.

Connect your Atlas cluster to your MongoDB Compass to get started. Latest version of  MongoDB Compass will have this shell, so if you don’t find this shell then please install the latest version for this to work.

Now lets start with the functions.

  1. find() :- You need this function for data extraction in the shell.

In the shell we need to first write the “use database name”  code to access the database  then use .find() to extract data which has name “Wetpaint”

For the above query we get the following result:-

 

The above result brings us to another function .pretty() .

2. pretty() :- this function helps us see the result more clearly.

Try it yourself to compare the results.

3. count() :- Now lets see how many entries we have by the company name “Wetpaint”.

So we have only one document.

4. Comparison operators :-

“$eq” : Equal to

“$neq”: Not equal to

“$gt”: Greater than

“$gte”: Greater than equal to

“$lt”: Less than

“$lte”: Less than equal to

Lets see how this works.

5. findOne() :- To get a single document from a collection we use this function.

 

6. insert() :- This is used to insert documents in a collection.

Now lets check if we have been able to insert this document or not.

Notice that a unique id has been added to the document by default. The given id has to be unique or else there will be an error. To provide a user defined  id use “_id”.

 

So, with that we come to the end of the discussion on the MongoDB. Hopefully it helped you understand the topic, for more information you can also watch the video tutorial attached down this blog. The blog is designed and prepared by Niharika Rai, Analytics Consultant, DexLab Analytics DexLab Analytics offers machine learning courses in Gurgaon. To keep on learning more, follow DexLab Analytics blog.


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ARIMA (Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average)

arima-time series-dexlab analytics

This is another blog added to the series of time series forecasting. In this particular blog  I will be discussing about the basic concepts of ARIMA model.

So what is ARIMA?

ARIMA also known as Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average is a time series forecasting model that helps us predict the future values on the basis of the past values. This model predicts the future values on the basis of the data’s own lags and its lagged errors.

When a  data does not reflect any seasonal changes and plus it does not have a pattern of random white noise or residual then  an ARIMA model can be used for forecasting.

There are three parameters attributed to an ARIMA model p, q and d :-

p :- corresponds to the autoregressive part

q:- corresponds to the moving average part.

d:- corresponds to number of differencing required to make the data stationary.

In our previous blog we have already discussed in detail what is p and q but what we haven’t discussed is what is d and what is the meaning of differencing (a term missing in ARMA model).

Since AR is a linear regression model and works best when the independent variables are not correlated, differencing can be used to make the model stationary which is subtracting the previous value from the current value so that the prediction of any further values can be stabilized .  In case the model is already stationary the value of d=0. Therefore “differencing is the minimum number of deductions required to make the model stationary”. The order of d depends on exactly when your model becomes stationary i.e. in case  the autocorrelation is positive over 10 lags then we can do further differencing otherwise in case autocorrelation is very negative at the first lag then we have an over-differenced series.

The formula for the ARIMA model would be:-

To check if ARIMA model is suited for our dataset i.e. to check the stationary of the data we will apply Dickey Fuller test and depending on the results we will  using differencing.

In my next blog I will be discussing about how to perform time series forecasting using ARIMA model manually and what is Dickey Fuller test and how to apply that, so just keep on following us for more.

So, with that we come to the end of the discussion on the ARIMA Model. Hopefully it helped you understand the topic, for more information you can also watch the video tutorial attached down this blog. The blog is designed and prepared by Niharika Rai, Analytics Consultant, DexLab Analytics DexLab Analytics offers machine learning courses in Gurgaon. To keep on learning more, follow DexLab Analytics blog.


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ARMA- Time Series Analysis Part 4

ARMA Time series DexLab Analytics

ARMA(p,q) model in time series forecasting is a combination of Autoregressive  Process also known as AR Process and Moving Average (MA) Process where p corresponds to the autoregressive part and q corresponds to the moving average part.

 

Autoregressive Process (AR) :- When the value of Yt in a time series data is regressed over its own past value then it is called an autoregressive process where p is the order of lag into consideration.

Where,

Yt = observation which we need to find out.

α1= parameter of an autoregressive model

Yt-1= observation in the previous period

ut= error term

The equation above follows the first order of autoregressive process or AR(1) and the value of p is 1. Hence the value of Yt in the period ‘t’ depends upon its previous year value and a random term.

Moving Average (MA) Process :- When the value of Yt of order q in a time series data depends on the weighted sum of current and the q recent errors i.e. a linear combination of error terms then it is called a moving average process which can be written as :-

yt = observation which we need to find out

α= constant term

βut-q= error over the period q .

ARMA (Autoregressive Moving Average) Process :-

The above equation shows that value of Y in time period ‘t’ can be derived by taking into consideration the order of lag p which in the above case is 1 i.e. previous year’s observation and the weighted average of the error term over a period of time q which in case of the above equation is 1.

How to decide the value of p and q?

Two of the most important methods to obtain the best possible values of p and q are ACF and PACF plots.

ACF (Auto-correlation function) :- This function calculates the auto-correlation of the complete data on the basis of lagged values which when plotted helps us choose the value of q that is to be considered to find the value of Yt. In simple words how many years residual can help us predict the value of Yt can obtained with the help of ACF, if the value of correlation is above a certain point then that amount of lagged values can be used to predict Yt.

Using the stock price of tesla between the years 2012 and 2017 we can use the .acf() method in python to obtain the value of p.

.DataReader() method is used to extract the data from web.

The above graph shows that beyond the lag 350 the correlation moved towards 0 and then negative.

PACF (Partial auto-correlation function) :- Pacf helps find the direct effect of the past lag by removing the residual effect of the lags in between. Pacf helps in obtaining the value of AR where as acf helps in obtaining the value of MA i.e. q. Both the methods together can be use find the optimum value of p and q in a time series data set.

Lets check out how to apply pacf in python.

As you can see in the above graph after the second lag the line moved within the confidence band therefore the value of p will be 2.

 

So, with that we come to the end of the discussion on the ARMA Model. Hopefully it helped you understand the topic, for more information you can also watch the video tutorial attached down this blog. The blog is designed and prepared by Niharika Rai, Analytics Consultant, DexLab Analytics DexLab Analytics offers machine learning courses in Gurgaon. To keep on learning more, follow DexLab Analytics blog.


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