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Bayesian Thinking & Its Underlying Principles

Bayesian Thinking & Its Underlying Principles

In the previous blog on Bayes’ Theorem, we left off at an interesting junction where we just touched upon the ideas on prior odds ratio, likelihood ratio and the resulting Posterior Odds Ratio. However, we didn’t go into much detail of what it means in real life scenarios and how should we use them.

In this blog, we will introduce the powerful concept of “Bayesian Thinking” and explain why it is so important. Bayesian Thinking is a practical application of the Bayes’ Theorem which can be used as a powerful decision-making tool too!

We’ll consider an example to understand how Bayesian Thinking is used to make sound decisions.

For the sake of simplicity, let’s imagine a management consultation firm hires only two types of employees. Let’s say, IT professionals and business consultants. You come across an employee of this firm, let’s call him Raj. You notice something about Raj instantly. Raj is shy. Now if you were asked to guess which type of employee Raj is what would be your guess?

If your guess is that Raj is an IT guy based on shyness as an attribute, then you have already fallen for one of the inherent cognitive biases. We’ll talk more about it later. But what if it can be proved Raj is actually twice as likely to be a Business Consultant?!

This is where Bayesian Thinking allows us to keep account of priors and likelihood information to predict a posterior probability.

The inherent cognitive bias you fell for is actually called – Base Rate Neglect. Base Rate Neglect occurs when we do not take into account the underlying proportion of a group in the population. Put it simply, what is the proportion of IT professionals to Business consultants in a business management firm? It would be fair to assume for every 1 IT professional, the firm hires 10 business consultants.

Another assumption could be made about shyness as an attribute. It would be fair to assume shyness is more common in IT professionals as compared to business consultants. Let’s assume, 75% of IT professionals are in fact shy corresponding to about 15% of business consultants.

Think of the proportion of employees in the firm as the prior odds. Now, think of the shyness as an attribute as the Likelihood. The figure below demonstrates when we take a product of the two, we get posterior odds.

Plugging in the values shows us that Raj is actually twice as likely to be a Business consultant. This proves to us that by applying Bayesian Thinking we can eliminate bias and make a sound judgment.

Now, it would be unrealistic for you to try drawing a diagram or quantifying assumptions in most of the cases. So, how do we learn to apply Bayesian Thinking without quantifying our assumptions? Turns out we could, if we understood what are the underlying principles of Bayesian Thinking are.

Principles of Bayesian Thinking

Rule 1 – Remember your priors!

As we saw earlier how easy it is to fall for the base rate neglect trap. The underlying proportion in the population is often times neglected and we as human beings have a tendency to just focus on just the attribute. Think of priors as the underlying or the background knowledge which is essentially an additional bit of information in addition to the likelihood. A product of the priors together with likelihood determines the posterior odds/probability.

Rule 2 – Question your existing belief

This is somewhat tricky and counter-intuitive to grasp but question your priors. Present yourself with a hypothesis what if your priors were irrelevant or even wrong? How will that affect your posterior probability? Would the new posterior probability be any different than the existing one if your priors are irrelevant or even wrong?

Rule 3 – Update incrementally

We live in a dynamic world where evidence and attributes are constantly shifting. While it is okay to believe in well-tested priors and likelihoods in the present moment. However, always question does my priors & likelihood still hold true today? In other words, update your beliefs incrementally as new information or evidence surfaces. A good example of this would be the shifting sentiments of the financial markets. What holds true today, may not tomorrow? Hence, the priors and likelihoods must also be incrementally updated.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Bayesian Thinking is a powerful tool to hone your judgment skills. Developing Bayesian Thinking essentially tells us what to believe in and how much confident you are about that belief. It also allows us to shift our existing beliefs in light of new information or as the evidence unfolds. Hopefully, you now have a better understanding of Bayesian Thinking and why is it so important.

On that note, we would like to say DexLab Analytics is a premium data analytics training institute located in the heart of Delhi NCR. We provide intensive training on a plethora of data-centric subjects, including data science, Python and credit risk analytics. Stay tuned for more such interesting blogs and updates!

About the Author: Nish Lau Bakshi is a professional data scientist with an actuarial background and a passion to use the power of statistics to tackle various pressing, daily life problems.

 

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The Almighty Central Limit Theorem

The Almighty Central Limit Theorem

The Central Limit Theorem (CLT) is perhaps one of the most important results in all of the statistics. In this blog, we will take a glance at why CLT is so special and how it works out in practice. Intuitive examples will be used to explain the underlying concepts of CLT.

First, let us take a look at why CLT is so significant. Firstly, CLT affords us the flexibility of not knowing the underlying distribution of any data set provided if the sample is large enough. Secondly, it enables us to make “Large sample inference” about the population parameters such as its mean and standard deviation.

The obvious question anybody would be asking themselves is why it is useful not to know the underlying distribution of a given data set?

To put it simply in real life, often times than not the population size of anything will be unknown. Population size here refers to the entire collection of something, like the exact number of cars in Gurgaon, NCR at any given day. It would be very cumbersome and expensive to get a true estimate of the population size. If the population size is unknown its underlying distribution will be known too and so will be its standard deviation. Here, CLT is used to approximate the underlying unknown distribution to a normal distribution. In a nutshell, we don’t have to worry about knowing the size of the population or its distribution. If the sample sizes are large enough, i.e. – we have a lot of observed data, it takes the shape of a symmetric bell-shaped curve. 

Now let’s talk about what we mean by “Large sample inference”. Imagine slicing up the data into ‘n’ number of samples as below:

Now, each of these samples will have a mean of their own.

Therefore, effectively the mean of each sample is a random variable which follows the below distribution:

Imagine, plotting each of the sample mean on a line plot, and as “n”, i.e. the number of samples goes to infinity or a large number the distribution takes a perfect bell-shaped curve, i.e – it tends to a normal distribution.

Large sample inferences could be drawn about the population from the above distribution of x̅. Say, if you’d like to know the probability that any given sample mean will not exceed quantity or limit.

The Central Limit Theorem has vast application in statistics which makes analyzing very large quantities easy through a large enough sample. Some of these we will meet in the subsequent blogs.

Try this for yourself: Imagine the average number of cars transiting from Gurgaon in any given week is normally distributed with the following parameter . A study was conducted which observed weekly car transition through Gurgaon for 4 weeks. What is the probability that in the 5th week number of cars transiting through Gurgaon will not exceed 113,000?

If you liked this blog, then do please leave a comment or suggestions below.

About the Author: Nish Lau Bakshi is a professional data scientist with an actuarial background and a passion to use the power of statistics to tackle various pressing, daily life problems.

About the Institute: DexLab Analytics is a premier data analytics training institute headquartered in Gurgaon. The expert consultants working here craft the most industry-relevant courses for interested candidates. Our technology-driven classrooms enhance the learning experience.

 

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Upskill and Upgrade: The Mantra for Budding Data Scientists

Upskill and Upgrade: The Mantra for Budding Data Scientists

Have the right skills? Then the hottest jobs of the millennium might be waiting for you! The job profiles of data analysts, data scientists, data managers and statisticians harbour great potentials.

However, the biggest challenge in today’s age lies in preparing novice graduates for Industry 4.0 jobs. Although no one has yet cleared which roles will cease to exist and which new roles will be created, the consultants have started advising students to imbibe necessary skills and up-skill in domains that are likely to influence and carve the future jobs. Becoming adaptive is the best way to sail high in the looming technology-dominated future.

Data Science and Future

In this context, data science has proved to be one of the most promising fields of technology and science that exhibits a wide gap between demand and supply yet an absolute imperative across disciplines. “Today there is no shortage of data or computing abilities but there is a shortage of workforce equipped with the right skill set that can interpret data and get valuable insights,” revealed James Abdey, assistant professorial lecturer Statistics, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

He further added that data science is a multidisciplinary field – drawing collectives from Economics, Mathematics, Finance, Statistics and more.

As a matter of fact, anyone, who has the right skill and expertise, can become a data scientist. The required skills are analytical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making aptitude. “As everything becomes data-driven, acquiring analytical and statistical skill sets will soon be imperative for all students, including those pursuing Social Sciences or Liberal Arts and also for professionals,” said Jitin Chadha, founder and director, Indian School of Business and Finance (ISBF).

DexLab Analytics is one of the most prominent deep learning training institutes seated in the heart of Delhi. We offer state-of-the-art in-demand skill training courses to all the interested candidates.

The Challenges Ahead

The dearth of expert training faculty and obsolete curriculum acts as major roadblocks to the success of data science training. Such hindrances cause difficulty in preparing graduates for Industry 4.0. In this regard, Chiraag Mehta from ISBF shared that by increasing international collaborations and intensifying industry-academia connect, they can formulate an effective solution and bring forth the best practices to the classrooms. “With international collaborations, higher education institutes can bring in the latest curriculum while a deeper industry-academia connect including, guest lecturers from industry players and internships will help students relate the theory to real-world applications, ” shared Mehta during an interview with Education Times.

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Industry 4.0: A Brief Overview

The concept Industry 4.0 encompasses the potential of a new industrial revolution – where gathering and analyzing data across machines will become the order of the day. The rise of this new digital industrial revolution is expected to facilitate faster, more flexible and efficient processes to manufacture high-quality products at reduced costs – thus, increasing productivity, switch economies, stimulate industrial growth and reform workforce profile.

Want to know more about data science courses in Gurgaon? Feel free to reach us at DexLab Analytics.

 

The blog has been sourced fromtimesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/education/news/learn-to-upskill-and-be-adaptive/articleshow/68989949.cms

 

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Bayes’ Theorem: A Brief Explanation

Bayes’ Theorem: A Brief Explanation

(This is in continuation of the previous blog, which was published on 22nd April, 2019 – www.dexlabanalytics.com/blog/a-beginners-guide-to-learning-data-science-fundamentals )

In this blog, we’ll try to get a hands-on understanding of the Bayes’ Theorem. While doing so, hopefully we’ll be able to grasp a basic understanding of concepts such as Prior odds ratio, Likelihood ratio and Posterior odds ratio.

Arguably, a lot of classification problems have their root in Bayes’ Theorem. Reverend T. Bayes came up with this superior logical function, which mathematically deducts the probability of an event occurring from a larger set by “flipping” the conditional probabilities.

 


 

Consider,  E1, E2, E3,……..En to be a partition a larger set “S” and now define an Event – A, such that A is a subset of S.

Let the square be the larger set “S” containing mutually exclusive events Ei’s. Now, let the yellow ring passing through all Ei’s be an event – A.

Using conditional probabilities, we know,

Also, the relationship:

Law of total probability states:

Rearranging the values of  &  gives us the Bayes Theorem:

The values of  are also known as prior probabilities, the event A is some event, which is known to have occurred and the conditional probability   is known as the posterior probability.

Now that, you’ve got the maths behind it, it’s time to visualise its practical application. Bayesian thinking is a method of applying Bayes’ Theorem into a practical scenario to make sound judgements.

The next blog will be dedicated to Bayesian Thinking and its principles.

For now, imagine, there have been news headlines about builders snooping around houses they work in. You’ve got a builder in to work on something in your house. There is room for all sorts of bias to influence you into believing that the builder in your house is also an opportunistic thief.

However, if you were to apply Bayesian thinking, you can deduce that only a small fraction of the population are builders and of that population, a very tiny proportion is opportunistic thieves. Therefore, the probability of the builder in your house being an opportunistic thief is actually a product of the two proportions, which is indeed very-very small.

Technically speaking, we call the resulting posterior odds ratio as a product of prior odds ratio and likelihood ratio. More on applying Bayesian Thinking coming up in the next blog.

In the meantime try this exercise and leave your comments below in the comments section.

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In the above example on “snooping builders”, what are your:

  • Ei’s
  • Event – A
  • “S”

About the Author: Nish Lau Bakshi is a professional data scientist with an actuarial background and a passion to use the power of statistics to tackle various pressing, daily life problems.

About the Institute: DexLab Analytics is a premier data analyst training institute in Gurgaon specializing in an enriching array of in-demand skill training courses for interested candidates. Skilled industry consultants craft state-of-the-art big data courses and excellent placement assistance ensures job guarantee.

For more from the tech series, stay tuned!

 

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Study: The Demand for Data Scientists is Likely to Rise Sharply

Study: The Demand for Data Scientists is Likely to Rise Sharply

Data is like the new oil. A large number of companies are leveraging artificial intelligence and big data to mine these vast volumes of data in today’s time. Data science is a promising landmine of job opportunities – and it’s high time to consider it as a successful career avenue.

The prospect of data science is skyrocketing. Today, it is estimated that more than 50000 data science and machine learning jobs are lying vacant. Plus, nearly 40000 new jobs are to be generated in India alone by 2020. If you follow the global trends, the role of data scientist has expanded over 650% since 2012 yet only 35000 people in the US are skilled enough.

Data scientists are like the platform that connects the dots between programming and implementation of data to solve challenging business intricacies – says Pankaj Muthe, Academic Program Manager (APAC), Company Spokesperson, QlikTech. The company delivers intuitive platform solutions for embedded analytics, self-service data visualizations and guided analytics and reporting across the globe.

According to a pool of experts, data science is the hottest job trend of this century and is the second most popular degree to have at the master level next to MBA. No wonder, this new breed of science and technology is believed to be driving a new wave of innovation! Data scientists and front-end developers attracted the highest remuneration across Indian startups throughout 2017.

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Eligibility Criteria

To become a professional data scientist, a degree in computer science/engineering or mathematics is a must. Most of the data scientists have a knack for intricate tasks and aptitude to learn challenging programming languages. Any good organization seeks interested and intelligent candidates with the zeal to learn more. The subjects in which they need to be proficient are mathematics, statistics and programming. Moreover, data science jobs need a very sound base in machine learning algorithms, statistical modeling and neural networks as well as incredible communication skills.

Today, a lot of institutes offer state-of-the-art data science online courses that prove extremely beneficial for career growth and expansion. Combining theoretical knowledge and technical aspects of data science training, these institutes provide skill and assistance to develop real-world applications. DexLab Analytics is one such institute that is located in the heart of Delhi NCR. For more, feel free to reach us at <www.dexlabanalytics.com>

Future Prospects

After land, labour and capital, data ranks as the fourth factor of production. According to the US Department of Statistics, the demand for data engineers is likely to grow by 40% by 2020. If you are looking for a flourishing career option, this is the place to be: an entry-level engineer begins their career as a business analyst and then proceeds towards becoming a project manager. Later, after years of experience, these virgin business analysts further get promoted to become chief data officers.

 

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Know All about Usage-Driven Grouping of Programming Languages Used in Data Science

Know All about Usage-Driven Grouping of Programming Languages Used in Data Science

Programming skills are indispensable for data science professionals. The main job of machine learning engineers and data scientists is drawing insights from data, and their expertise in programming languages enable them to do this crucial task properly. Research has shown that professionals of the data science field typically work with three languages simultaneously. So, which ones are the most popular? Are some languages more likely to be used together?

Recent studies explain that certain programming languages are used jointly besides other programming languages that are used independently. With the survey data collected from Kaggle’s 2018 Machine Learning and Data Science study, usage patterns of over 18,000 data science experts working with 16 programming languages were analyzed. The research revealed that these languages can actually be categorized into smaller sets, resulting in 5 main groupings. The nature of the groupings is indicative of specific roles or applications that individual groups support, like analytics, front-end work and general-purpose tasks.

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Principal Component Analysis for Dimension Reduction

In this article, we will explain how Bob E. Hayes, PhD holder, scientist, blogger and data science writer has used principal component analysis, a type of data reduction method, to categorize 16 different programming languages. Herein, the relationship among various languages is inspected before putting them in particular groups. Basically, principal component analysis looks into statistical associations like covariance within a large collection of variables, and then justifies these correlations with the help of a few variables, called components.

Principal component matrix presents the results of this analysis. The matrix is an nXm table, where:

n= total no. of original variables, which in this case are the number of programming languages

m= number of main components

The strength of relationship between each language and underlying components is represented by the elements of the matrix. Overall, the principal component analysis of programming language usage gives us two important insights:

  • How many underlying components (groupings of programming languages) describe the preliminary set of languages
  • The languages that go best with each programming language grouping

Result of Principal Component Analysis:

The nature of this analysis is exploratory, meaning no pre-defined structure was imposed on the data. The result was primarily driven by the type of relationship shared by the 16 languages. The aim was to explain the relationships with as less components as possible. In addition, few rules of thumb were used to establish the number of components. One was to find the number of eigen values with value greater than 1 – that number determines the number of components. Another method is to identify the breaking point in the scree plot, which is a plot of the 16 eigen values.

businessoverbroadway.com

 

5-factor solution was chosen to describe the relationships. This is owing to two reasons – firstly, 5 eigen values were greater than one and secondly, the scree plot showed a breaking point around 6th eigen value.

Following are two key interpretations from the principal component matrix:

  • Values greater than equal to .45 have been made bold
  • The headings of different components are named on the basis of tools that loaded highly on that component. For example, component 4 has been labeled as Python, Bash, Scala because these languages loaded highest on this component, implying respondents are likely to use Bash and Scala if they work with Python. Other 4 components were labeled in a similar manner.

Groupings of Programming Languages

The given data set is appropriately described by 5 tool grouping. Below are given 5 groupings, including the particular languages that fall within the group, meaning they are likely to be used together.

  1. Java, Javascript/Typescript, C#/.NET, PHP
  2. R, SQL, Visual Basic/VBA, SAS/STATA
  3. C/C++, MATLAB
  4. Python, Bash, Scala
  5. Julia, Go, Ruby

One programming language didn’t properly load into any of the components: SQL. However, SQL is used moderately with three programming languages, namely Java (component 1), R (component 2) and Python (component 4).

It is further understood that the groupings are determined by the functionality of different languages in the group. General-purpose programming languages, Python, Scala and Bash, got grouped under a single component, whereas languages used for analytical studies, like R and the other languages under comp. 2, got grouped together. Web applications and front-end work are supported by Java and other tools under component 1.

Conclusion:

Data science enthusiasts can succeed better in their projects and boost their chances of landing specific jobs by choosing correct languages that are suited for the job role they want. Being skilled in a single programming language doesn’t cut it in today’s competitive industry. Seasoned data professionals use a set of languages for their projects. Hence, the result of the principal component analysis implies that it’s wise for data pros to skill up in a few related programming languages rather than a single language, and focus on a specific part of data science.

For more help with your data science learning, get in touch with DexLab Analytics, a leading data analyst training institute in Delhi. Also check our Machine learning courses in Delhi to be trained in the essential and latest skills in the field.

 
Reference: http://customerthink.com/usage-driven-groupings-of-data-science-and-machine-learning-programming-languages
 

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Private Banks, Followed by E-commerce and Telecom Industry Shows High Adoption Rates for Data Analytics

Private Banks, Followed by E-commerce and Telecom Industry Shows High Adoption Rates for Data Analytics

Are you looking for a data analyst job? The chances of bagging a job at a private bank are more than that a public bank. The former is more likely to hire you than the latter.

As a matter of fact, data analytics is widely being used in the private banking and e-commerce sectors – according to a report on the state of data analytics in Indian business. The veritable report was released last month by Analytics India Magazine in association with the data science institute INSOFE. Next to banking and ecommerce, telecom and financial service sectors have started to adopt the tools of data analytics on a larger scale, the report mentioned.

The report was prepared focusing on 50 large firms across myriad sectors, namely Maruti Suzuki and Tata Motors in automobiles, ONGC and Reliance Industries under oil-drilling and refineries, Zomato and Paytm under e-commerce tab, and HDFC and the State Bank of India in banking.

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If you follow the study closely, you will discover that in a nutshell, data analytics and data science boasts of a healthy adoption rate all throughout – 64% large Indian firms has started implementing this wonder tool at their workplaces. As a fact, if a firm is found to have an analytics penetration rate of minimum 0.75% (which means, at least one analytics professional is found out of 133 employees in a company), we can say the company has adopted analytics.

Nevertheless, the rate of adoption was not universal overall. We can see that infrastructure firms have zero adoption rates – this might be due to a lack of resources to power up a robust analytics facility or whatever. Also, steel, power and oil exhibited low adoption rates as well with not even 40% of the surveyed firms crossing the 0.75% bar. On contrary, private banks and telecom industry showed a total 100% adoption rates.

Astonishingly, public sector banks showed a 50% adoption rate- almost half of the rate in the private sector.

The study revealed more and more companies in India are looking forward to data analytics to boost sales and marketing initiatives. The tools of analytics are largely employed in the sales domain, followed by finance and operations.

Apparently, not much of the results were directly comparable with that of the last year’s study. Interestingly, one metric – analytics penetration rate – was measured last year as well, which is nothing but the ratio of analytics-oriented employees to the total. Also, last year, you would have found one out of 59 employees in an average organization, which has now reached one data analyst for every 36 employees.

For detailed information, read the full blog here: qz.com/india/1482919/banks-telcos-e-commerce-firms-hire-most-data-analysts-in-india

If you are interested in following more such interesting blogs and technology-related updates, follow DexLab Analytics, a premium analytics training institute headquartered in Gurgaon, Delhi. Grab a data analyst certification today and join the bandwagon of success.

 

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Data Driven Projects: 3 Questions That You Need to Know

Data Driven Projects: 3 Questions That You Need to Know

Today, data is an asset. It’s a prized possession for companies – it helps derive crucial insights about customers, thus future business operations. It also boosts sales, predicts product development and optimizes delivery chains.

Nevertheless, several recent reports suggest that even though data floats around in abundance, a bulk of data-driven projects fail. In 2017 alone, Gartner highlighted 60% of big data projects fail – so what leads it? Why the availability of data still can’t ensure success of these projects?

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Right data, do I have it?

It’s best to assume the data which you have is accurate. After all, organizations have been keeping data for years, and now it’s about time they start making sense out of it. The challenge that they come across is that this data might give crucial insights about past operations, but for present scenario, they might not be good enough.

To predict the future outcomes, you need fresh, real-time data. But do you know how to find it? This question leads us to the next sub-head.

Where to find relevant data?

Each and every company does have a database. In fact, many companies have built in data warehouses, which can be transformed into data lakes. With such vast data storehouses, finding data is no more a difficult task, or is it?

Gartner report shared, “Many of these companies have built these data lakes and stored a lot of data in them. But if you ask the companies how successful are you doing predictions on the data lake, you’re going to find lots and lots of struggle they’re having.”

Put simply, too many data storehouses may pose a challenge at times. The approach, ‘one destination for all data in the enterprise’ can be detrimental. Therefore, it’s necessary to look for data outside the data warehouses; third party sources can be helpful or even company’s partner network.

How to combine data together?

Siloed data can be calamitous. Unsurprisingly, data is available in all shapes and is derived from numerous sources – software applications, mobile phones, IoT sensors, social media platforms and lot more – compiling all the data sources and reconciling data to derive meaningful insights can thus be extremely difficult.

However, the problem isn’t about the lack of technology. A wide array of tools and software applications are available in the market that can speed up the process of data integration. The real challenge lies in understanding the crucial role of data integration. After all, funding an AI project is no big deal – but securing a budget to address the problem of data integration efficiently is a real challenge.

In a nutshell, however data sounds all promising, many organizations still don’t know how achieve full potential out of data analytics. They need to strengthen their data foundation, and make sure the data that is collected is accurate and pulled out from a relevant source.

A good data analyst course in Gurgaon can be of help! Several data analytics training institutes offer such in-demand skill training course, DexLab Analytics is one of them. For more information, visit their official site.

The blog has been sourced fromdataconomy.com/2018/10/three-questions-you-need-to-answer-to-succeed-in-data-driven-projects

 

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Top 5 Industry Use Cases of Predictive Analytics

Top 5 Industry Use Cases of Predictive Analytics

Predictive analytics is an effective in-hand tool crafted for data scientists. Thanks to its quick computing and on-point forecasting abilities! Not only data scientists, but also insurance claim analysts, retail managers and healthcare professionals enjoy the perks of predictive analytics modeling – want to know how?

Below, we’ve enumerated a few real-life use cases, existing across industries, threaded with the power of data science and predictive analytics. Ask us, if you have any queries for your next data science project! Our data science courses in Delhi might be of some help.

Customer Retention

Losing customers is awful. For businesses. They have to gain new customers to make up for the loss in revenue. But, it can cost more, winning new customers is usually hailed more costly than retaining older ones.

Predictive analytics is the answer. It can prevent reduction in the customer base. How? By foretelling you the signs of customer dissatisfaction and identifying the customers that are most likely to leave. In this way, you would know how to keep your customers satisfied and content, and control revenue slip offs.

Customer Lifetime Value

Marketing a product is the crux of the matter. Identifying customers willing to spend a large part of their money, consistently for a long period of time is difficult to find. But once cracked, it helps companies optimize their marketing efforts and enhance their customer lifetime value.

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Quality Control

Quality Control is significant. Over time, shoddy quality control measures will affect customer satisfaction ratio, purchasing behavior, thus impacting revenue generation and market share.

Further, low quality control results in more customer support expenses, repairs and warranty challenges and less systematic manufacturing. Predictive analytics help provide insights on potential quality issues, before they turn into crucial company growth hindrances.

Risk Modeling

Risk can originate from a plethora of source, and it can be any form. Predictive analytics can address critical aspects of risk – it collects a huge number of data points from many organizations and sort through them to determine the potential areas of concern.

What’s more, the trends in the data hint towards unfavorable circumstances that might impact businesses and bottom line in an adverse way. A concoction of these analytics and a sound risk management approach is what companies truly need to quantify the risk challenges and devise a perfect course of action that’s indeed the need of the hour.

Sentiment Analysis

It’s impossible to be everywhere, especially when being online. Similarly, it’s very difficult to oversee everything that’s said about your company.

Nevertheless, if you amalgamate web search and a few crawling tools with customer feedback and posts, you’d be able to develop analytics that’d present you an overview of the organization’s reputation along with its key market demographics and more. Recommendation system helps!

All hail Predictive Analytics! Now, maneuver beyond fuss-free reactive operations and let predictive analytics help you plan for a successful future, evaluating newer areas of business scopes and capabilities.

Interested in data science certification? Look up to the experts at DexLab Analytics.

The blog has been sourced fromxmpro.com/10-predictive-analytics-use-cases-by-industry

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